The Rise of Video Interviews

The rise of video interviews

Over the last several years, organizations of all sizes and from all industries are increasing the usage of video interviewing. For hiring managers, the incentive to use video interviews is in the rich benefits gained in their ability to manage the speed and candidate accuracy for their specific recruiting process.  With all industries participating in the rise of video interviews, being prepared is of ultimate importance.

If you haven’t yet been asked to engage in a video interview process, chances are you will sooner than later.

To understand the popularity from the employer’s perspective let’s browse a few perks from their side and why they are engaged in the rise of video interviews.

  • Easier process for high volume job applications.
  • A decrease in the volume of poor quality in-person interviews.
  • Reduced hiring process timeframe.
  • Better collaboration between recruiters and hiring managers.
  • Accessibility to non-local candidates.

So how to prepare for yours?

When you attend an interview, consider how long it takes to prepare for the face to face meeting.  Then add travel time. It’s not a short process. Undoubtedly, the perk to video interviews lies in the time-saving.

Dress as you would for an in-person interview from head to toe. Doing so will make you feel more confident. Don’t try the old newscaster trick of wearing a blazer with sweatpants assuming you’ll only be seen from the waist up. 

It’s also recommended to avoid wearing bright, flashy colors as this can look too busy on camera. Choose something that looks neatly pressed while you’re sitting down. Wear your interview outfit during your trial run so you can get feedback from your friend or family member about how it looks on screen.

Choose a location that’s free from the distractions of children, roommates or pets. Hang a sign on the door asking mail carriers and package deliverers not to ring the doorbell. Avoid public places such as coffee shops or courtyards which can suddenly become loud. Likewise, steer clear of libraries where you could be interrupted and asked to quiet down.

Make sure the background is free from clutter and embarrassing items like laundry piles. Set up lighting that’s bright but not glaring, illuminating your face from the front. Natural light is the best.

Turn off email, text and social media alerts. While it may seem like a stretch, be aware of any software updates and other notifications that may show up on the screen during the interview. Turn off programs that might interfere with the webcam and close browser tabs.

Test your technology

A few days before the interview, do a technical trial run to make sure your equipment is working correctly. Download any apps or plugins you’ll need. Whether you’re using Skype for Business or another video interview platform, make sure you have a username that’s professional, just as you would with your email address or social media handle. 

Check that your computer’s camera, microphone and internet connection are working. If possible, do a trial run with a friend or family member so you have ample time to adjust if any of your equipment or software is malfunctioning.

Charge it up

If you’re using a laptop or tablet, make sure it’s fully charged on the day of the interview. Better yet, keep them plugged in during the interview.  And pick a spot that has strong Wi-Fi. If you must use a tablet, find a way to keep it stationary. Otherwise, the screen will appear shaky when holding the device. Avoid using a smartphone for video interviews if possible.

Testing, testing ….

Check your volume controls and speak clearly so the microphone picks up your voice and the interviewer doesn’t have to strain to hear you. This can take practice but you really want to understand how to project your voice. And remember that digital connections can sometimes be delayed. To avoid talking over the interviewer or having your first few words cut out, let the interviewer finish the question and then pause for a few seconds before delivering your answer.

Prepare for the Questions

Like the in-person interview, you’ll want to prepare for the interview questions. To be a key player in the rise of video interviews, you’ll want to nail these questions.

  • Tell me about yourself.
  • Why do you want to work here?
  • Why are you leaving your current job?
  • What are your weaknesses?
  • What’s your expected salary?

As you would in a traditional interview, close the video interview by sharing your appreciation. Be gracious and listen for the cue to end the interview on a high note.

Need to get ready for job search success?  Our team at Power Writers Canada is here to help.

We offer Resume updates, Cover Letters, LinkedIn Optimization, Recruiter Services, and Professional Career Coaching.

Book a free 15-min consult here https://calendly.com/powerwritersusa-ca

6 Quality Interview Questions

6 quality interview questions

The key to getting a great job offer is portraying an authentic, positive and lasting impression. Whether you’re a seasoned employee or just getting started, these 6 quality interview questions can help the process.

With a professional resume, this is achieved in the first point of contact.  In addition to this, you’ve got to nail the job interview. Asking insightful questions during a job interview demonstrates professionalism, thoughtfulness, and commitment.

That being said, candidates can get lost when it comes to asking the right sort of questions. This blunder shows either a lack of preparation or the stress of the interview. Neither of which leaves a positive impression. 

Like much of life, the failsafe is to be present during the entire interview. Presence shows confidence. Additionally, the best interview questions are oftentimes the ones asked naturally from engagement in the conversation. 

6 Quality Interview Questions

1. What is the history of this position?

It’s valuable to ask about the history of the role. In this case, the answer is useful to know what environment you’re entering.   Furthermore, it shows forethought and attentive care for the position. 

Perhaps this opening was recently created to support company growth. In which case, ask a follow-up question about who owned the responsibilities up to this point, and how the duties will be transitioned.

If you are interviewing for a position left vacant by someone’s departure, get a sense of what happened.

  • Why did the predecessor leave the job?
  • Where they promoted or internally transferred?

If the predecessor was internally repositioned, ask about direct training potential.

2. How does this position support management and serve direct reports?

Certainly, the answers to this question will help you gain insight into the position and how it fits the framework of the company as a whole.

  • Who is your support?
  • Who will you supervise and guide?

Consequently, understanding this will offer a glimpse of what skills are critical for your success.

3. In the first 6 months, what accomplishments would you like from me?

This targetted question shows your commitment to adding value and delivering on expectations. It’s one thing to understand routine tasks and responsibilities, it’s yet another to fully understand expectations.

Altogether, an interview has a singular goal. To demonstrate your fit for the position.  Inquiring about expectations directly speaks to this goal.

4. Which part of the position has the steepest learning curve? What can I do in order to get up to speed quickly?

For some jobs, learning the technology or the internal company procedures is the most challenging aspect of coming on board. For others, it is about understanding the human network. Therefore, guidance on how to speed up the learning process can give you a significant advantage.

5. How is the feedback process structured?

Feedback is how humans improve. To excel in a new role, you’re going to need analysis as a way of marking the perimeter of success. 

Does this company limit its feedback cycle to the annual reviews? Does the hiring manager make it a priority to deliver just-in-time acknowledgment and suggestions for improvement?

As a result, asking these questions represents your intent to learn and grow with the role.

6. What opportunities will I have to learn and grow?

Does the company offer formal or informal mentoring and coaching? Does it invest in continued education or professional training?

Great companies want to hire people who are dedicated to personal and professional growth. Show your hiring manager that continued development is important to you.

Close the interview on a high note.

As a bonus, there are several questions one must never ask during an interview. 

Asking about money, raises and promotions are taboo and can show yourself as arrogant and self-serving. 

Stay away from company gossip. It matters not what your friends, friend says about the company politics or a piece of news read in a local paper, keep your head in the game of professionalism and acknowledge the interview as an opportunity. 

The goal is to end the interview in a powerful and impactful way. For this reason, maintaining professionalism, acting authentically and these 6 quality interview questions are all part of the equation of your success.

How To Choose a Career Coach

Choosing a career coach

With the closing of the decade, we’re seeing all sorts of 10-year reflection content on social media right now.  Have you seen it?  Perhaps it’s the end of an era that sparks the human interest to compare and assess using time as the main reference. Whatever the reasoning now is a great time to check in on career goals. Here are our tips on how to choose a career coach, should you be so inclined.

What A Career Coach Can Do

Some of you would have been in school at the crack of 2010 and are now well seated in your chosen careers.  Others may have changed directions several times and are looking back at an intersection of self-discovery and career interests. Looking forward, consider the benefits of sourcing, vetting and connecting with a career coach who can help you identify goals for the next 10 years of career growth.

6 Tips for Choosing a Career Coach

1. Define The Problems.

Ask yourself: Why do I need a career coach? If you’re not clear, take out a piece of paper and write down every question that comes to mind about your career transition.  Once you understand your needs, you can identify the best type of coach for the job.

If you’re interested in changing career directions: Find a coach who is experienced in career reinvention.

If you are looking to stay in your field but need help navigating the job search process: Find a coach who has strength in resume writing or has exceptional referrals to a professional resume writer.  Additionally, this coach should also have good tactics for job searching via social media and other job-hunting avenues.

2. The Interview

Yes, of course, it’s recommended to interview potential coaches! This is your career. You’re in the driver’s seat so vet ay potentials and set up some meetings.

Keep in mind, some coaches offer a free introductory call, while others only do so unless you sign on for three months or more. Also, it’s common for people to work with career coaches on a shorter-term basis, such as three sessions for job-search coaching or six sessions to complete a career exploration package.

Smart questions to ask during the interview:

  • How would you describe your coaching style?
  • What should I expect from our work together?
  • What are your fees, packages and/or recommended routes?
  • Can you share some of your success stories? (Listen to see if the coach tends to work with people like you.)

3. Choosing The Services Best Suited to You.

Coaches charge in a variety of ways: by the hour, by the month, by the task or some combination of all three. Some ask for a multi-session commitment; others go session-by-session.

Some offer full branding packages that include reworking a resumé, LinkedIn profile and cover letters while others offer each of those services a-la-carte.

Ask a lot of questions and be sure the coach is clear about what you’ll get for your money before you start work together.

4. Ready Yourself to Win.

Coaching sessions are generally about an hour long and to the betterment of both parties, you want to go in prepared.  Ready any questions or specific topics of direction.  Organize relevant documentation. Speak your mind. Be honest about the process, if the coach is doing (or not doing) something that doesn’t sit right, share and help the relationship achieve full potential.

Additionally, maintain open lines of communication regarding any personal challenges impacting your career plans.  The goal is to craft a realistic action plan.  To do this, all facts should be on the table.

5. Respect The Process.

To achieve a deeper understanding, many coaches use one or more industry-specific assessments.  Techniques such as personality tests and interest inventories help you identify your strengths, interests and best work options.

Now, while these are helpful, they can’t always provide you with “the answer.”

All career changes involve a process of assessment, reflection, research, and testing. As well as hard work and patience. This all takes time before you gain real and lasting clarity. 

6. Manage Timeline Expectations.

There is no clear timetable for a career change. It truly depends on you, your goals, the state of the economy and a thousand other variables. From a coach, you may only need a couple of brainstorming sessions, or you may get into the process and realize you’d prefer a few months of support.

Just know, you are going to hit plateaus and they will be frustrating. Be patient and loving to yourself.

Ultimately, the key to a good coaching relationship is finding the right coach for your specific needs and then working together effectively.  Some coached are available to advise clients in person; others use a mix of phone, video conferencing and in-person meetings. 

Ideally when vetting a potential coach think about what best suits your style of work ethic and daily practices. On our team at Power Writers Canada, we have exceptional career coaches available. Reach out if you would like a recommendation and contact details.

Whether you are anticipating a new career direction, seeking advice on the job search or planning for semi-retirement, a good coach can help you reach goals faster and more successfully than by going it alone.



Building Your Senior Management Team

Senior-level team building

In the startup stage of every enterprise, it’s a matter of survival to create the most cost-effective operating system.  Naturally, this requires owners to do as much as possible on their own. But with growth comes a massive shortage of time which means eventually, building your senior management team will need mandatory.

Especially if your plan is to take the business to the next level.

Building the best team demands matching people’s strengths to specific jobs.  So while your best buddy from grade school may feel like the right choice, you’ll still need to cross-reference strengths and skills to job requirements prior to signing an offer letter.

When assembling a senior team, you’ll want to take the time and consider all the critical areas of your business. At the rudimentary level, we’ve assembled a thorough recap of senior-level roles. 

A Breakdown of the Roles.

Chief Executive Officer (CEO). 

Basically, and without much exaggeration, the CEO is the boss of everyone and everything (but reports to the Board of Directors). Realistically, you’ll either be the CEO or hire someone more suited to the depth of the role. Which is not entirely uncommon. 

Owners are oftentimes ‘too close to the center’ when it comes to determining the company’s executive strategy. Therefore, hiring your own boss is fundamentally in the company’s best interest. 

Your CEO will have the ability to rise above the daily details and decide where the industry and business are headed. An exceptional CEO must be a remarkable strategic thinker.  They must be able to decide the company’s best route for navigating the future market conditions. 

That being said, the CEO’s ultimate skill is in hiring and firing. It is essential to assemble the right management team as support for your CEO. As a result, your chosen CEO will need to be able to identify and hire the best, fire the ones who don’t work out, and run the show all the same.

Chief Operating Officer (COO)

A COO handles a company’s complex operational details. Think about UPS moving three billion packages in the two weeks before Christmas: The company’s COO ensures the business can deliver day after day. Their team creates the systems to track the measurements and take action when the company isn’t delivering as expected.

When ensuring smooth operations become a big part of your business, it’s time to hire someone who revels in measurements, operations, and details.

President

To be honest, the role of a president is a little less specific than other executive team members. Presidents can oversee staff functions–human resources, finance, and strategy–while the COO oversees daily operations. In some organizations, the title of president is a synonym for COO, especially in smaller companies. Sometimes, the president fills gaps left by the COO and CEO. Other times, the title goes to someone you want at the strategy table but who doesn’t have an obvious C-level title.

Additionally, not every enterprise needs a president as many find this title fully covered by the efforts of a CEO and COO.  All things to consider when looking at your own enterprise.

Chief Financial Officer (CFO)

Plain and simple, your CFO handles the money. They create budgets and financing strategies. They figure out if it’s better for your business to lease or buy. Then they build the control systems that monitor your company’s financial health. Money is your business’s blood, and in entrepreneurship, cash flow is everything.

If you don’t know the difference between cash flow and profit–go find yourself a CFO.

Chief Marketing Officer (CMO)

Many current business battles are battles of marketing. Especially when corporate strategy hinges on marketing strategy. As a result, companies have been bringing in a marketing expert at the C-level rather than as a traditional vice president role. 

The CMO owns the marketing strategy–and that often includes implementation of the sales strategy. Your CMO will learn your industry inside out and help you position your product/service, differentiate it from your competitors’, enlist distributors, and make sure customers learn to crave your product.

If your business’s success depends mainly on marketing, you need a CMO. That could be you–but only if you have time to keep up with competitors, oversee the marketing plan, and still do the rest of your job–and do it well.

Otherwise, you need to look for the person with the right kind of buzz for the job, ready to keep up on what’s hot and what’s not.

Chief Technology Officer (CTO)

This role is only really significant if your business or industry is impacted by technology. Specifically, if your company’s chosen programming language affects the overall company strategy. In this case, you may need a CTO.

Is your enterprise tech-based? If so, delve into your professional network and find yourself a strategic thinker rooted in the tech industry. If you are not tech-based, you can sit this hiring process out and keep the focus on the above mentioned senior-level roles.

Building Your Senior Management Team

Ultimately, trust your instincts when interviewing and hiring. You have successfully grown your business to the level of needing an executive team, which is a major win all in itself.

As always with leadership; hire smart, fire fast, keep working that strategy to get the work done.

If you need inspiration for job postings at the Executive and Senior-Level, we’ve got some great site resources available in our Career Help section.

Planning an Executive Job Search

executive job search strategy

The final quarter of the year can be a catalyst for change. With routine year-end reviews and personal goal reflection, executives who feel that they ought to be advancing further in their careers or are not being fairly compensated can seek to make changes. Planning an executive job search is vital to balancing your job search time and efforts.

For this reason, we’ve outlined 5 tips to help you plan as efficiently as possible: 

1. Optimize Your Resume in Advance

Of course, resumes are the cornerstone of any job search plan. So its best to ensure yours is current, consistent, and compelling.  Overall, executive-level careers generally require long term employment in individual positions. As a result, it’s common to require a resume refresh when looking to make career changes.

2. Learn How to Articulate Your Key Success Stories

Consider the use of metrics and data as this helps authenticate your story and give scale to your professional accomplishments. Any awards received can be great conversational additions during interviews or networking opportunities.

While it may feel awkward at first, ultimately, it beneficial to understand how best to communicate your story with ease and grace.

3. Be Mindful of Your Online Presence

In today’s digital age, recruiters and employers are taking to the internet to search for, and vet, potential executive candidates. If you intend to present yourself as an ideal candidate, think clearly about what all your online profiles say about you.

In consideration of this, look for areas to improve in order to best reflect your career successes. Perhaps archive a few of the college day party pics or any office related vices. Clean your look up to shine the way you prefer to be seen.

4. Prepare Interview Answers

As one would expect, executive interviews are fraught with tough questions for potential candidates to navigate. The aim is to test your ability to perform under pressure.

Oftentimes, executives are asked tricky questions, including those relating to professional failure. Be open and honest. Especially when demonstrating your ability to learn from mistakes while improving your decision-making skills.

Furthermore, you could also be asked for reasons behind leaving your last job. Again, it is important, to be honest, yet professional. Be ready to answer this while directing the conversation on to the next question.

A little research can go a long way. Google some executive-level interview questions or ask your network if they have any tips. Practice your responses to find your voice and boost your chances of success.

5. Build and Maintain Your Network

As a rule, professional networks should be nurtured throughout your entire career. The aim is to ensure dependability during periods of uncertainty. Without a doubt, this network can be your safety net should directions change in the future.

Additionally, executive recruiters can be a key component of your professional network. When recruiters call, even if you are not interested in the role you can still cultivate a long-term professional connection. Offer helpful candidate suggestions or explain your thoughts regarding why the opportunity might not be right for you. 

6. Set Goals

To make sure you don’t succumb to job-seeker drifting, give yourself time-bound goals throughout your search. It’s your time and effort, use them wisely.

Finally, don’t sweat it. If all this overwhelms you, our team at Power Writers Canada has just what you need.  We offer Resume updates, Cover Letters, LinkedIn Profile Optimization, Interview Coaching, and Recruitment Services. 

Connect with us here for a free 15-minute consultation. https://calendly.com/powerwritersusa-ca

Can a Resume Be Multiple Pages?

Resume length is always a hot topic in our office. Can a resume be multiple pages? The overall feeling is that if a resume is too long, then it’s at risk of a hiring manager/recruiter not reading the entire document. On the other hand, if the resume is too short, it can come across like a shortage of desired experience.

Without a doubt, there’s no magic resume length that works for everyone.  Every resume should be customized according to each individuals need.

One-Page Resumes

Depending on where you are on the career path, a well written one-page resume can absolutely make the perfect impact. However, with expansive education histories and applicants navigating a dynamic workforce, single-page resumes oftentimes create limitations.

Absolutely, the goal is to create a document that represents skills, accomplishments, and experience.  If the focus is primarily on the appropriate number of pages this can really inhibit one’s ability to effectively market themselves. 

There’s just no advantage to cramming everything on one page. Especially if the end product cluttered and difficult to read.

Situations where one-page resume can be ideal:

  • Fewer than 10 years’ experience
  • Career changes where past experience doesn’t transfer to new goals. 
  • Work history of one or two positions with the same employer

Two-page resumes

But how long should a resume be if you’ve been in the workforce for a while? This is a valid question for those with extensive work histories.

Obviously, with one-page, we’re working with a small space yet aiming to offer a high impact. With a heading at the top and resume sections below including qualifications summary, experience, education, and skills, there’s not a lot of room left over for in-depth accomplishments.

Two pages allow extra space to really showcase the history while targeting your desired job postings. 

Just remember, you do want page-two to see the light of day! If the resume length extends to two pages, be sure to include the most compelling information on the first page.

Three pages or longer

While three pages may seem like you’re entering novella territory, this resume length is oftentimes necessary for high-level professionals.

To keep it concise, write with the employer’s needs and wants in mind.

In addition to this, we recommend you take inventory of why you need a longer format. As well as that, we need to allow for several adjustments before going to multiple pages.

The aim is to build on quality versus quantity.

First to consider is letting go of early career experiences that don’t market to current goals. A resume should not be an obituary of one’s career. It should tell a detailed story highlighting the specifics of your job search.

The ideal resume length depends on you

Are you a student or new graduate with qualifications that don’t quite fit on one page? Try two pages. Are you a CEO with a penchant for getting to the point? Try a one-page resume. The rule is there is no rule.

Resume Goals: Craft an easy to read document that consists of relevant content with a clear and consistent theme. Aim to distinguish from the competition by portraying current and detailed information.  Target keyword optimization to meet ATS approvals.

If all of these factors can be positively addressed on one page, so be it. But if it takes two pages—or more—to address each factor, that’s fine too.

Finally, don’t sweat it. If all this overwhelms you, our team of professional resume writers has just what you need.  Reach out for a free resume review and consultation. We offer Resume updates, Cover Letters, LinkedIn Profile Optimization, Coaching and Recruitment services. 

Connect with us here for a free 15-minute consultation. https://calendly.com/powerwritersusa-ca



How To Negotiate Salary and Benefits

When it comes to hiring negotiations employers rarely make their best offer first. Like all business practices, the negotiation process is strategic. Additionally, candidates who intentionally negotiate salary and benefits generally earn more than those who don’t.

Plus, a well-thought-out negotiation shows the strength of your character which, in turn, portrays the powerhouse employee you plan to be.

Prior to the interview, make time to do research. Know the industry salary standards and learn about the company’s current salary and benefits ranges. These understandings will be valuable when asked for your ideal salary.

During the interview, hold off on the money talk.

Honestly, discussing financials too early can be a major cooling point. The time to talk about money is when they’ve fallen in love with you. Once the employer has decided you’re right for the job, then all focus can move to the big money.

Inevitably, of course, you will be asked about salary expectations. It’s a common tendency for people to lowball their salary range. We get it.  Everyone wants to stay in the game when this question comes into play. It helps to specifically know in advance what you want from the position.

Know your worth and consider not just your short-range salary goals but also your long-term career momentum.

The Offer Is On The Table: 3 Tips for Next Steps

Don’t Commit Too Quickly: Employers often offer the job and salary simultaneously. Never say yes right away — even if you like the offer. Tell them you’ll give them an answer within a certain time frame. There is nothing wrong with coming back to try and get more.

Articulate Your Expectations: Consider whatever has a perceived value to you.  This could be time off, flexibility about where you work, autonomy or ownership over a specific area or the basics of job title. Tell the employer what you want from the job, in terms of salary, benefits, and opportunity.

Negotiate Extras: If the employer can’t offer you the salary you want, think about other valuable options that might not cost as much. Remember, education is a great benefit which not only costs employers less to offer but can make a big difference in your long-term marketability.

You also can add a few contingencies showing your confidence in your performance.

You could ask the employer to give you a salary review after six months rather than a year. You could open the discussion for a year-end bonus if you achieve certain goals. It shows that you believe in yourself and are committed to bringing significant value to the organization.

Now, the first step is to get yourself out there! Whether you’re needing a Resume update, Cover Letter, Recruitment Services or LinkedIn optimization, our team at Power Writers has what you need.

Follow the link for a free resume review and consultation. https://calendly.com/powerwritersusa-ca

8 Tips to Beat Applicant Tracking Systems

8 tips to beat applicant tracking systems

From the first known resume in 1482 by Leonardo DaVinci through the 1500s in England into the 20th Century and current Digital Age. Resume formats have changed dramatically over the years. Modern-day resumes must now contain a very specific format in order to beat Applicant Tracking Systems.

If you’re on the search for a new job and not getting the desired traction, your resume may not be ideal for ATS. In which case, have a read below for 8 tips to beat Applicant Tracking Systems.

#1 – Use ATS Resume Keywords Correctly.

The design of Applicant Tracking Software is to scan for keywords that relate to the job and industry. The proper usage of keywords is what sets your resume apart from others by gaining ATS high ranking. Like a high score in PacMan, ATS high ranking means your resume levels up.

Look at the job description of your ideal position. If you’re applying for a job within a specific industry, this is where you can identify the major keywords that relate to that industry or the position you seek. 

Include these keywords in a core competencies or skills section.

But be careful, one thing that’s just as bad as not having the correct keywords is over-using them. The ATS will reject an overstuffed resume as quickly as it would a resume with insufficient keywords.

#2 – Format Your Resume Correctly.

Stick to a traditional resume format at all times.

Text boxes, footers, headers, and graphics read as clutter during the scan which can result in your resume being rejected. Choose a basic format like reverse-chronological, functional or hybrid, to ensure the resume can be scanned by ATS and easy for a recruiter to read.

#3 – Send The Correct File Type

 Applicant tracking systems need to be able to scan and read your resume. The safest way to ensure that your resume will be read is to submit it in a Microsoft Word Doc file. 

Even though many of the systems are now advanced enough to read a PDF, you should still send a Doc file to be on the safe side. A Doc file is the preferred file type for both ATS and many recruiters.

You should also always check the job description to see if the employer wants a certain file type. Often times, employers will specify a certain file type, so it’s recommended to have both versions available.

#4 – Label Sections

If your layout is not done properly, the ATS may have trouble identifying where you worked, what you did, and how long you were there. We want to ensure the ATS can read the entire resume correctly. To do this, label your resume sections properly. Use subheadings such as work experience, education, and interests, etc.

Also, verify that the location, position, and length of employment information you provide is clear and consistent throughout your resume.

use a professional font

#5 – Use A Professional Font.

We can’t stress this enough, stick to a professional font. When your resume passes through ATS, the next step is recruiter review. And professional recruiters generally do not favor comic sans.

The best fonts to use for your resume are:

  • Arial
  • Calibri
  • Georgia
  • Helvetica

#6 – Make Spelling And Grammar Top-Level Priority.

Spelling errors can, and will, cause a resume to be automatically rejected. Additionally, the majority of recruiters will also dismiss a resume even if it contains only a single error.

Consider this, according to CareerBuilder, 58% of resumes contain spelling and grammatical errors. Read that again, over half of the resumes out there are a hot-mess in the actual wording department.  Join 40% of applicants that get spelling and grammar correct.

Pro-Tip: Grammerly is a wonderful tool!

#7 – Resume File Name

Yes, what you name the file matters. Even though it might get through ATS, recruiters will often ignore unprofessional resume names. Use your first and last name, or a combination of the two.

You should also add either the word “resume” or the position you seek.

Examples:

JohnS.Resume.doc

JohnSmith.Resume.doc

John.SalesManager.doc

This is also important because if a recruiter needs to go back and find you in the system, they can easily do so by searching your name in the database. This also holds true if someone is referring you. Your resume needs to be easily found should the recruiter want to pull up your file. 

#8 – Make Sure You Are Qualified For The Job.

To sum it all up, make sure you meet the qualifications of the job posting. Blindly sending out tons of resumes is a waste of your time.

It’s better to take your time and go through each job description to verify that you’re qualified. The ATS are designed to see if the candidate is a good match for the job and verify that he or she has the qualifications needed.

However, don’t be discouraged from applying for jobs where you meet most of the qualifications. If a position asks for 2 years of experience and you only have one, go for it anyway!

Patience and persistence are the names of the game now. It may take longer than you anticipated, or you could find the ideal fit quite quickly. Stay with it to step up to your next opportunity!

If all this overwhelms you…

Remember, you can always hire a professional. Whether you’re needing a Resume update, Cover Letter, Recruitment Services or LinkedIn Profile Optimization, our team at PWC has what you need.

Follow the link for a free resume review and consultation. https://calendly.com/powerwritersusa-ca

Do I Need Multiple Versions Of My Resume?

multiple resume yes or no

It’s a common question.  Do I need multiple versions of my resume? 

This is an important issue to discuss because a lot of professionals tend to develop a background in at least three, or even more, thematic work areas as time and their careers progress. In this article, we show both sides of the equation and the reasoning behind them. 

Spoiler alert:  The short answer is no but let’s discuss all angles.

In modern business practices, job seekers develop a wide range of skills and experiences. It is competitive out there and staying ahead of the game requires diversification. For example, some job applicants have worked in human resources, communications, and event planning. 

“The quote I got from XYZ Resume Writers which says I need 3 different resumes and to focus on one specialization to keep the resume simple. Do I really need multiple versions of my resume?”

This perspective and business model is, more times than not, a reflection of the individual writer’s underdeveloped skill set.  It takes finesse to really shape the context of a work history into a professional format with high success rates.

So, can HR, Communications, and Event Planning all be covered in a single resume? 

We believe in a resounding YES. A professional resume writer with extensive years of experience can formulate diverse history into a keyword-rich resume that exceeds expectations.

It’s not what you’ve done in the past, but rather the direction you plan to go next.

There are always transferable skills that help ease the transition and bridge roles.

A written format that highlights all the skills acquired in these roles and draws a bigger picture directed towards the roles you are aiming for. 

Without the resume reading as cluttered and indigestible to the reader’s eye.

professional resume writer uses keywords for success

It’s about streamlining without losing focus on keywords. It’s about representing your assets with varying themes and keeping it tidy.

Plus, it is time-consuming to keep modifying a major chunk of your resume just to highlight focus. Why pay a writer to create a product which you then have to babysit and micro manage?

All this is assuming you are maintaining your current career path. 

Now, if you’re jumping entire industries or career fields then, yes, perhaps it may be necessary to have more than one resume in your toolkit.

For example, you started out as a roofer and then became a builder and later moved into sales of roofing products. As part of your role, you were very involved in a new software implementation and you’ve decided to go into IT. That sort of transition requires a finely-tuned eye to keep the right content, and minimize or eliminate the (less) valuable content…. relating directly to how the resume performs for you.

Additionally, If there’s too much going on it can be difficult for recruiters to judge whether you are actually good at the role they want you to perform. Again, a really strong resume writer will help direct the keywords and content to be heavy in the direction you want to go.

That being said, if you are looking to change career paths, Power Writers USA is here to help reshape your resume for success across your entire search. Feel free to connect with us for a free consultation and resume review.

Remember, the name of the game is algorithms and ATS filters, which is everybody’s challenge right now.  The past few years, formatting styles have changed and with that in mind, we’d love to take a look at what specifics points our team can do to improve the impact your resume makes across all your ideal job prospects.

Tips for Speaking with Recruiters

Be prepared when the recruiters call.

Are you anticipating phone calls from job recruiters? If so, do you have questions about what to expect or how to prepare for these phone calls? Let’s take a look at some best practices for how to prepare for your conversation with a recruiter.

It is important to keep in mind that time is of the essence. Do not worry if the initial phone call is brief. In this blog post, from Kelly Mitchell: People. Technology. Service. they highlight six points to help keep you focused on the task at hand.

Some of the key points from their list are: Be straightforward about your experience. Emphasize your skills related specifically to the job description. Be prepared to talk about money. Be ready to explain the gaps in your resume. And probably the most important point is to be yourself.

As job seekers get excited about an opportunity, they can put a lot of pressure on themselves to be the perfect candidate for that job. They become less authentic in their communication and as a result, they lose their edge….When you take stock of your value as an employee, and you know your worth, you level the playing field in the interview, which gives you that winning edge and confidence…..Focus less on being the perfect person for the job and go into the interview ready to honestly communicate what makes you distinctive and to ask lots of questions to determine if the job is really the best next role for your career.” – Stefan Schneider



Here are a few additional points worth noting as you prepare to speak with recruiters. Read: How to Work With Executive Recruiters This process is meant to not only streamline your job search but it is also meant to help streamline a business’s hiring process. This post explains how you should be prepared to set boundaries about what you are willing to consider. For example, if you are not willing to relocate for work it is important to set that boundary at the start. It will save a lot of time and energy for everyone involved. With that being said, it is important to offer an explanation as to why you have your particular boundaries. This allows the recruiter a better understanding of what to focus on and what to remove as potential opportunities in your job search. This point below is particularly noteworthy and provides a good framework for preparing your questions:

Ask smart questions. If a recruiter approaches you about a career opportunity, show you’re job-search savvy by inquiring about the size of the employer, its culture, the competencies needed for the position and whether you’re the first candidate to be considered. Also request a copy of the job’s specifications. This will signal to the recruiter that you are somebody who understands the bigger picture and is digging deep to understand what the job is all about.
http://guides.wsj.com/careers/how-to-work-with-executive-recruiters/how-to-work-with-executive-recruiters/

Once you have had the call with the recruiter the communication does not end there. Even after they have set you up with an interview or two keep in touch. This will provide you the opportunity to discuss what went well with the interview and perhaps provide additional details to help target your job search efforts. Staying in touch with the recruiter will also ensure you do not miss out on new opportunities that may arise.

Additional Reading:

https://www.forbes.com/sites/lizryan/2017/03/14/heres-what-to-say-when-the-recruiter-calls/#6770daae1914

https://www.forbes.com/best-professional-recruiting-firms/#3a37f7f920b2

https://www.forbes.com/best-executive-recruiting-firms/#52a5e96529be


Power Writers Canada wants to know what you think of this, and other blog articles we post.  Your career change is unique and  PWC is here to help you along the way with Resume Writing Services, Cover Letter Writing, CV’s, LinkedIn Profiles Updates, and more.  Contact us now for a free consultation and resume evaluation!